Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

NORTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD COMPANY v. SANDERS.

decided: April 19, 1897.

NORTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD COMPANY
v.
SANDERS.



ERROR TO THE COURT OF APPEALS FOR THE NINTH CIRCUIT.

Author: Harlan

[ 166 U.S. Page 622]

 MR. JUSTICE HARLAN delivered the opinion of the court.

This action was brought by the Northern Pacific Railroad Company to recover from the defendants in error, the original defendants, the possession of section twenty-one, township ten north of range three west in the county of Lewis and Clarke in the State of Montana.

The railroad company claims title under the act of Congress of July 2, 1864, 13 Stat. 365, c. 217, granting lands to aid in the construction of a railroad and telegraph line from Lake Superior to Puget Sound on the Pacific coast, by the northern route.

The defendants do not assert title in themselves, but resist the claim of the railroad company upon the ground that, at the time of the definite location of the Northern Pacific Railroad and of the filing of the plat thereof in the office of the Commissioner of the General Land Office, such "claims" were made of record upon the lands in dispute as excluded them from the grant to the Northern Pacific Railroad Company.

Congress granted to the Northern Pacific Railroad Company every alternate section of public land, "not mineral," designated by odd numbers, to the amount of twenty alternate sections per mile on each side of the railroad line, as the company might adopt, through the Territories of the United States, and ten alternate sections per mile on each side of the railroad whenever it passed through any State, "and whenever on the line thereof, the United States have full title, not reserved, sold, granted or otherwise appropriated, and free from preemption, or other claims or rights at the time the line of said road is definitely fixed, and a plat thereof filed in the office of the Commissioner of the General Land Office; and whenever, prior to said time, any of said sections or parts of sections shall have been granted, sold, reserved, occupied by homestead settlers or preempted or otherwise disposed of, other lands shall be selected by said company in lieu thereof, under

[ 166 U.S. Page 623]

     the direction of the Secretary of the Interior, in alternate sections and designated by odd numbers, not more than ten miles beyond the limit of said alternate sections. . . . Provided further, That all mineral lands be, and the same are hereby, excluded from the operations of this act, and in lieu thereof a like quantity of unoccupied and unappropriated agricultural lands, in odd-numbered sections, nearest to the line of said road may be selected as above provided: And provided further, That the word 'mineral,' when it occurs in this act, shall not be held to include iron and coal." § 3.

The sixth section directed the lands to be surveyed for forty miles in width on both sides of the entire line of the road after the general route was fixed and as fast as was required by the construction of the railroad, and provided that "the odd sections of land hereby granted shall not be liable to sale, or entry or preemption, before or after they are surveyed, except by said company, as provided in this act; but the provisions of the act of September, eighteen hundred and forty-one, granting preemption rights, and the acts amendatory thereof, and of the act entitled 'An act to secure homesteads to actual settlers on the public domain,' approved May twenty, eighteen hundred and sixty-two, shall be, and the same are hereby, extended to all other lands on the line of said road, when surveyed, excepting those hereby granted to said company. And the reserved alternate sections shall not be sold by the government at a price less than two dollars and fifty cents per acre, when offered for sale." § 6.

The amended complaint alleged that the railroad company duly accepted the terms and conditions of the act of Congress; that the general route of the railroad extending through the State of Montana was duly fixed February 21, 1872; that the land in dispute was on and within forty miles of such general route, and at that date was "public land to which the United States had full title, not reserved, sold, granted or otherwise appropriated, and free from preemption or other claims or rights"; that at the date of the passage of the act of 1864, as well as when said general route was fixed, no part of the land in controversy was "known mineral land," and

[ 166 U.S. Page 624]

     "was not mineral land, nor was any part of said last-described land within any exceptions from said grant"; that on July 6, 1882, the railroad company definitely fixed the line of its railroad, extending opposite to and past said section 21, township 10 north, range 3 west, and filed a plat thereof in the office of the Commissioner of the General Land Office; that "said land is on and within forty miles of said line of railroad so definitely fixed"; that thereafter the company duly constructed and completed that portion of its railroad and telegraph line extending over and along its line of definite location, whereupon the President of the United States appointed three commissioners to examine the same, who reported that that portion of the line had been completed in a good, substantial and workmanlike manner; that the President of the United States duly accepted said line of road and telegraph so constructed and completed; that at the date of so definitely locating the line of railroad, and at the time of the filing of the plat thereof in the office of the Commissioner of the General Land Office, as above stated, the land in dispute was "not known" to be mineral land, but was agricultural land to which "the United States had full title, not reserved, sold, granted or otherwise appropriated, and free from preemption or other claims or rights.

The defendants, in their answer, "confessing that said premises did not contain gold or other precious metals in paying quantities or in such quantity as to make the same, or any part thereof, commercially valuable therefor, nevertheless say, as to the northeast quarter of section 21, that heretofore, to wit, on the second day of August, 1880, Theodore H. Kleinschmidt, Edward W. Knight, Henry M. Parchen, Charles K. Wells, George P. Reeves, David H. Cuthbert, Cornelius Hedges and Stephen E. Atkinson, each being then and there a citizen of the United States, and each having theretofore filed upon a certain separate twenty acres on the northeast quarter of said section according to the laws of the Territory of Montana, and the mining usages and customs then in force in the unorganized mining district in which said land was situated, and being then in all respects qualified to enter mineral land under

[ 166 U.S. Page 625]

     the laws of the United States, did enter into the possession of, and did enter in the United States land office, and did file upon the said quarter of said section in the land office of the United States, at Helena, Montana, in which district said land was situate, as mineral land, and did apply for a patent therefor, and did then and there and in due form file an application to purchase said premises as such mineral land, and did then and there make oath before the register and receiver of said land office that they had discovered mineral thereon and had located the said quarter section as mineral land and claimed the same as such for the valuable mineral deposits therein, and that they had complied with chapter 6 of title XXXII of the Revised Statutes of the United States, which said application was so filed in the land office at Helena, Montana, under the oath of the said applicants, showing that they had complied with the law aforesaid, and describing the same by legal subdivisions, and they did then and there prior to filing said application post in a conspicuous place, on the claim embraced therein, a copy of said application and notice hereinafter mentioned, which said notice did then and there remain conspicuously posted, on said premises during the period of publication hereafter mentioned, and they did then and there file with their said application in said land office, an affidavit of two persons that such notice had been so duly posted, and did then and there file a copy of said notice in the land office with the register and receiver thereof, and by said application they requested to be permitted to purchase the same as mineral land, and they then and there undertook and offered to maintain by proof that the said premises were valuable for the gold contained therein and were mineral lands of the United States, to which they were entitled under the laws thereof, and that they had done the requisite amount of work thereon, to wit, work of the value of five hundred dollars, and were entitled to a patent therefor, which said application and affidavit and notice were then and there entered of record in said United States land office by the register and receiver thereof, and the said application was set for a hearing upon their said proofs to be produced, and notice of such hearing in

[ 166 U.S. Page 626]

     due form of law was given by the register and receiver in the proper newspaper designated for that purpose, and was duly published therein, which said entry, application, affidavits and notice were in all respects formal according to law, and the said application was set down for a hearing in said land office by the register and receiver thereof at the expiration of the period of time prescribed in said notice and at the date at which the same was so set, the said plaintiff having theretofore filed a protest against the perfection of the said entry, for the reason, as claimed by said plaintiff, that the same were not mineral land or commercially valuable for the gold or other precious metals therein contained; that said application was continued thereafter by the consent of parties or otherwise, from time to time, and was asserted and remained pending on the 6th day of July, 1882, and thereafter the said applicants on the 6th day of July, 1882, and thereafter as theretofore, averring their ability to prove that the said land was commercially valuable for the gold therein contained, and was mineral land within the definition of that phrase contained in the act granting lands to said plaintiff mentioned in said amended complaint, and the said applicants were on the date last aforesaid claiming, affirming and undertaking to maintain on their application for said premises in said land office, that the same was mineral land of the United States, to which they were entitled thereunder, and was not land in quality such as was described in the grant to the said plaintiff."

The answer alleged like filings, applications, etc., under the mining laws of the United States, as follows: By George P. Reeves, Helen H. Reeves, Laura C. Ballou, John W. Eddy, Evelyn M. Eddy, Edward W. Knight, Theodosia M. Knight and Anna Natolia King, August 12, 1880, upon twenty acres in the northwest quarter of said section 21; by Theodore Kleinschmidt, Henry M. Parchen, David H. Cuthbert, Stephen E. Atkinson, Lucius I. Rosecrans, Emma M. Parchen, Mary M. Kleinschmidt and Annie E. Cuthbert, February 19, 1881, upon twenty acres in the southwest quarter of the same section; and by Cornelius Hedges, Thomas A. H. Hay, Mary L. Guthrie, Patrick Quinn, Louis A. Walker, William D. Wheeler, Edna

[ 166 U.S. Page 627]

     L. Hedges and George E. Carpenter, March 13, 1880, upon twenty acres of the southeast ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.