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CLINTON v. MISSOURI PACIFIC RAILWAY.

decided: May 27, 1887.

CLINTON
v.
MISSOURI PACIFIC RAILWAY.



ERROR TO THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE UNITED STATES FOR THE DISTRICT OF NEBRASKA.

Author: Miller

[ 122 U.S. Page 473]

 MR. JUSTICE MILLER, after stating the case as reported above, delivered the opinion of the court.

The defendant in error insists that the case should be dismissed here for want of an assignment of errors. In regard to this it is sufficient to say that it would be difficult to formulate a more precise and specific assignment of error than that contained in the foregoing extract from the brief of the plaintiff.

The next point presented is, that the ruling of the court in this case, upon the question of the dismissal of the appeal, is not presented by any bill of exceptions, and that there is nothing in the record on which this court can review that decision. But the determination of this subject is the final judgment of the court. This is so in any sense in which it can be looked at. The order to dismiss is in the following terms:

"This cause coming on to be heard this 20th day of December, 1883, on the motion filed by the defendant to dismiss the appeal herein from the assessment of damages made by the commissioners appointed by the county court of Cass County, Nebraska, on the ground that said appeal was not taken within sixty days after the assessment of damages to said real estate by said commissioners, and for other reasons

[ 122 U.S. Page 474]

     contained in said motion on file, and on argument of counsel and on consideration thereof by the court, the court doth here find that said appeal was not taken within sixty days from the date of the assessment of damage made by such commissioners of the land in controversy, and the court doth sustain said motion to dismiss such appeal. It is ordered by the court here that said appeal be, and the same is hereby, dismissed, each party to pay its own costs."

If it be true that the appeal from the Cass County court to the District Court of that county was not taken in time, that is, within the sixty days referred to in this judgment, here is an end of the plaintiff's case in any court whatever. The Circuit Court for the District of Nebraska, assuming to come into the place of the District Court of Cass County, and exercising the powers which that court would have exercised if the case had not been removed, holds that no valid appeal was taken, and for that reason dismissed the case. If such finding be correct and it remains as a valid judgment it puts an end to the plaintiff's claim; it can nowhere be considered any further, and it is final upon the questions involved in the case.

As to the proposition that it cannot be reviewed here for want of a bill of exceptions, that is equally untenable. A judgment of a court appealed from is never incorporated into a bill of exceptions. It is always a part of the record of the case, and, like the plea and the verdict, it needs no bill of exceptions, but is simply to be transcribed as a part of the record. In this case it presents for itself the point or matter on which the court acted. It is there distinctly stated that the case was dismissed because the appeal was not taken within sixty days from the date of the assessment of damages made by the commissioners. Now, if the facts on which this decision was made are to be found in what may be properly called the record of the case before the judge when he decided it, as it is here presented to us, then there was no need of any bill of exceptions in the matter.

Whatever there was on that subject to guide the action of the court on the motion to dismiss the appeal was found in

[ 122 U.S. Page 475]

     the transcript as it came from the state court and was filed in the Circuit Court of the United States. If there was enough in that transcript to present the question in this case, then we must review it; for we take it to be a necessary rule in such cases that the transcript from the state court becomes as part of the record of the case in the Federal court. There is no mode by which that transcript, or any of its contents, can be abstracted and made a part of a bill of exceptions to be signed by the Federal judge. He can know nothing about what takes place in the state court, personally, and cannot therefore certify to it. It comes to him as certified by the court in which the proceedings were had. It is itself the foundation on which he is to act in the future proceedings in the case. It is already a record of another court transcribed and certified to his court, and in any writ of error from the Supreme Court of the United States that transcript from the state court necessarily becomes a part of the record.

As regards the main point, that the appeal was not taken within sixty days, this transcript, which is said to be imperfect, sufficiently shows that the commissioners were appointed; that they returned the award and assessment of damages into the county court on the first day of December, 1881, allowing to Clinton for damages to his property, known as as the "Mill Reserve," the sum of $850, and that on January 28, 1882, Clinton filed a notice of appeal from this award. Although the time is pretty close, it is very obvious -- these things being matters of record -- that Clinton intended to appeal ...


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